Allopurinol: Uses, Side effects, Dosage

Allopurinol is a Prescription Drug used to treat kidney stones and gout and to decrease levels of uric acid in people who are receiving cancer treatment.

  • The body naturally produces a substance known as urate, that is generally dissolved within the blood till it’s passed out of the body in the pee. once an excessive amount of urate is produced, or if the body cannot get eliminate it properly, the blood cannot dissolve all the urate and solid crystals will form in and around joints causing inflammation and pain.
  • Allopurinol blocks the enzyme xanthine oxidase, blocking the conversion of the oxypurines hypoxanthine and xanthine to uric acid. Elevated concentrations of oxypurine and oxypurine inhibition of xanthine oxidase through negative feedback ends up in a decrease in the concentrations of uric acid in the blood serum and pee. allopurinol conjointly facilitates the incorporation of hypoxanthine and xanthine into deoxyribonucleic acid and ribonucleic acid, resulting in a feedback inhibition of de novo purine synthesis and a decrease in blood serum uric acid concentrations as a result of an increase in nucleotide concentration.

 

  • The more common side effects of allopurinol can include: nausea, diarrhea, skin rash, gout flare-up (if you have gout), changes in your liver function test results While Serious side effects and their symptoms can include the following: Severe skin rash, Liver injury.
  • The dose of allopurinol for treating gouty arthritis is 200-600 mg daily depending on severity. The dose for treating high uric acid blood levels because of chemotherapy is 100-800 mg daily starting 1 or 2 days before therapy. It ought to be taken with food to avoid irritation of the stomach. so as to avoid the formation of kidney stones, patients ought to drink lots of fluids whereas taking allopurinol.
  • It Is a pregnancy category C drug By¬†US FDA This drug is only recommended for use during pregnancy when there are no alternatives and the benefit outweighs the risk.

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